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#1 nolvorite

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 12:03 PM

Is it difficult to get a panorama shot without a tripod? What are some tips you'd tell me to be able to take panorama shots easier?


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#2 Photographa

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 12:10 PM

I think it may actually be easier without a tripod.

 

The key that makes the panorama is the software you use. It doesn't matter if your individual photos are all over the place, it's all the software that stitches them together.

 

I'd recommend taking as many pictures as possible (some higher and some lower as you pan across the scene) on an automatic setting. The reason I say use an automatic setting is because your exposure will vary greatly if you use constant settings form one end to another end of a landscape, and it'll look ugly when they're all stitched.


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#3 nolvorite

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 12:21 PM

The thing is I find it a pain to hold the camera still in the same height and take an actual blurless panorama shot without it

 

Shouldn't the lighting be the same throughout?


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#4 Photographa

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 12:27 PM

The thing with the lighting is that panoramas are taken when you're out in the open, and it's inevitable that as you sweep across your scene, one part of that scene will be closer to the sun than another part.

 

If you're just doing it with a smartphone, it'll intelligently adjust so that everything is well-exposed. But, if you're using manual settings on a DSLR, the first part of your scene will be well-exposed, but if you don't change your settings throughout then the last part of your scene will either be too bright or too dim.

 

The cool thin about panoramas is your photos don't need to be taken at the same height. Since you're photographing the scene that's far away (and panoramas should only be done from far away, you wouldn't want a panorama of close-up objects) it doesn't matter if your hand moves an entire meter between shots!

 

Now to address camera shake, if you're zooming in at all, and you're not using a tripod, the shake from your camera may make everything blurry. The two ways to prevent this are to use a lens with Image Stabilization (it's standard on many entry-level lenses), or to photograph with a fast shutter speed. When it's bright out, you can use a very open aperture, which will let in a lot of light and allow you to use an insanely fast shutter to capture everything with no blur.


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#5 anchor93

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 11:43 PM

I think a good tip is to make sure your panoramas don't distort any objects to make it look like you're using an extreme fisheye lens. If there's in the frame that's close to your camera it'll get stretched out and that's not why you want a panorama. A panorama is for a distant landscape so that you can get more into a photo, not so that you can get a weird looking photo.


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