Jump to content


Photo

Easy portrait / interview lighting


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Amy

Amy

    Experienced

  • Members
  • PipPipPip

Posted 06 August 2013 - 08:18 PM

Here's an easy way to get some great lighting for portrait shots or a video interview. It works with any camera and it won't throw your white balance off, and you won't even need much processing. Find a window where natural light enters the room, but make sure it's not sun coming in. Position the subject about a foot or so away to the window so they're looking parallel to the window, and get in front of them head-on for your shot. One side of their face will be illuminated and the other will be dim if you're using any sort of auto exposure. The shadows will look very cool!
  • 0

#2 Shortie861

Shortie861

    Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPip

Posted 18 November 2013 - 07:00 AM

Thanks for sharing this. I like how it works with any camera as well which means I can test this out with the camera I currently have to see how well it works. Always looking for great and new ideas for my photo's and this is one that I am eager to test out and see how it works once I get the hang of the position :)


  • 0

#3 Amy

Amy

    Experienced

  • Members
  • PipPipPip

Posted 15 December 2013 - 11:54 AM

Thanks for sharing this. I like how it works with any camera as well which means I can test this out with the camera I currently have to see how well it works. Always looking for great and new ideas for my photo's and this is one that I am eager to test out and see how it works once I get the hang of the position :)

 

Definitely! You can also try playing around with warm vs. cool light in your shots to see what works best in portraits :D


  • 0

#4 Photographa

Photographa

    Experienced

  • Moderators

Posted 19 December 2013 - 02:57 PM

You can also easily set up artificial lighting for interviews. The procedure is one strong light source head-on, one strong light source from the side (almost a 90 degree angle), and one [weaker light] slightly behind the subject (maybe 130 degrees from the photographer) on the opposite side of the side-light.

 

Try it out!


  • 0

Check out these beginners' camera tutorials!